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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
whether they wanted to move them or whether they plan if syrians have always said they will not use these weapons on their own people. do they now -- go ahead. >> that's right and president obama in august clearly delineated those red lines that if they were to move these out of their storage site or to employ them against the syrian people or anyone else that would be a trigger point for some type of western action. now, depending -- the pentagon has drawn up preliminary plans to send as many as 75,000 troops into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly the movement of them. but it is more or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of presid
with the internet to this emphasis on data and what data can tell us and the cloud has given us an enormous potential. >> completely. information technology in and of itself creates 5% or 10% of the value. connectivity is 10% of what it's about. the rest is about better decision making, better analytics, saving money. about doctors that know how to make better diagnoses. that's where the next wave is. that's where the action is. what we're saying is, look, industrial companies stay out of that at their own peril. it's no longer a day where you say "i'm going to make the engine and let a software guy decide how it flies." that's what we're focused on. >> rose: are there businesses that still now are in the part of g.e. that you want to spin off or do you have the core companies for the future? >> i think we've got the best portfolio we've had in a decade. financial services is a lot smaller than the last time i was on your show, for obvious reasons. but we're in the range of 60% to 70% of the country is industrial 30% to 40% is financial. that's a pretty good balance for us. so i'd say we're
but there are families in connecticut who cannot do that tonight. and they need all of us right now. in the hard days to come that community needs us to be at our best as americans, and i will do everything in my power as president to help. because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memory-- memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of the victims. and in the words of scripture, heal the broken hearted, and bind up their wounds. >> rose: flags at the white house and the capitol are flying at half-mast in recognition of one of the worst school shootings in american history. the victims and their families are in our thoughts and prayers this evening as we air a program on a brain series about post traumatic stress disorder. after this break, our program on post traumatic disorder begins. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose comm
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own opinion is that they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose: al hunt, julianna goldman, george stevens, paul rud, leslie mann and paul apatow when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following kohl qol captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal cliff negotiatio
republicans who recognize that it is no longer in their interests to let us go over any cliff, because of short term politics will work to their advantage, the tax issue which has been the difficult part, the super committee we have it i call the avengers in politics, with powers untold in our history, that couldn't reach an agreement because the taxes, republicans wouldn't agree to any significant increase in taxes now they are talking to amounts that will reach that point and i am confident we will get something done. >> rose: jake tapper, ian mcewan, and norm ornstein when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> >> rose: additional funding provided by these funers. and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: one of the deadliest battle office the war in afghanistan took place on the morning of october 3rd, 2009, nearly 400 taliban fighters attacked 53 american troops stationed at a re
want you to know that you're wrong. this isn't, there's nobody else, there's just us. we are failing. >> you really believe this story, osama bin laden? >> yeah. >> what convinced you. >> her confidence. >> if you're right, the whole world's going to want in on this. you will never find him. >> it is one of the few moments >> rose: this is movie journalism that snaps and stains and par fi the decades clamor and clutter into narrative clarity with a sale tree kick. joining me is scribe writer mark boal and director of zero dark thirty kathryn bigelowing i'm very please to do have them back at this table, welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: i don't know where to start. let me start with the idea of bin laden and his, and the search to find him. when did that get inside your brain so that you thought maybe maybe. >> sometime, i don't remember exactly when. >> rose: it was before hurt locker was it not. >> it was around then, and after hurt locker was finished we were talking about what the next picture might be. with a decided to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in torabora in 2001
last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virgini
. also with us anne hathaway. she brings new grit and passion to the role of the tragic heroine and hugh jack mann jean valjean. i'm pleased to have all of them back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> how hard is it to take this kind of play and put it into a musical, this kind of musical and put it on filmlmlm >> it is extremely hard. what makes it hard is you are starting on a journey with a musical that 60 million people have seen but so many people hold so close to their hearts. and i realize people have a kind of protective and proprietorial attitude toward the musical. so i had to study what it is that people feel protective about. and why is it people go back and back to this musical. and i became convinced it's because the musical offers the people the opportunity to reexperience these strong emotions time and again. and sometimes they get stronger with time. >> rose: and those emotions are. >> well, i think it has an extraordinary ability, this musical, to jog in your memory knowledge of your own grieves, your own disappointments, your own pains and somehow process these t
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would
anything to us. we have to make our own music, we have to make music for our generation, for our friends. >> rose: right. >> and it is not -- we are going to wipe the slate clean. >> rose: gustavo dudamel and david byrne when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called
stand up and do was's right for us. >> rose: each day 34 americans are murdered by guns. >> yes. >> rose: this is what you call for. congress passing the fix gun checks act. >> yup. >> rose: which would close a loophole. >> well, 40% of the guns-- let me step back. congress voted some laws to be tough. congress always does this. they're so tough, for those that were sorry about a massacre, they voted no guns in the hands of criminals or drug addicts or psychiatric problems, people with psychiatric problems or minorities. and then, of course, they don't fund it they don't fund the enforcement so they can say to both sidesness don't worry about t i'm with you babes, but both sides. 40% of the guns that are sold in this country are sold either over the internet or at gun shows and the federal law-- the federal laws don't cover that, so you have to change that law. that is one thing that congress should do. and that's this gun check act. second, they've got to pass a ban on assault weapons. you know, the founding fathers never thought about assault weapons. they were talking about a militia,
language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're looking at here are two images taken by the famous photographer on the 30th of december 1941. winston churchill had just addressed the canadian parliament and he had made his way to the speakers chamber. he was looking for a drink, perhaps also for a cigar. and what he found instead was a photographer waiting for him. and more than that, because the photographer insisted on removing churchill's cigar. and then photographed the ensuing skoul. and it's clear that a few moments later the british prime minister lightened up
duchamps had done 50 years before. warhol popularized a lot of things that hadn't been popular, like using photography. there had been photography around in painting but very little. >> rose: so what was the reaction at his time when he was doing this, when he first did the campbell soup can and when he first did these things, did the portraiture and did -- >> he became hated immediately and he became unbelievably famous within just a couple of years one of the things that's fascinateing to me is a lot of the people who hated him were not artists and i love to say artists make art history and artists started being touched by warhol no matter what anybody was saying. >> then the curve -- >> larry bell, we have the quote from larry bell, who would expect this in 1963 or '64 saying "warhol's just changed everything." (laughs) rarery bell! >> rose: i forgot he died when he was only 58. >> that's right. far too young. >> rose: let's take a look at some of these. the first image is andy warhol self-portrait in 1967. when we see this, what made you include this and how do other people at this tab
us also, artist chuck close, jeff koons and john currin. >> i would think andy's cultural influences are also part of my cultural influences. think that i've always been in awe of his existentialism. of -- just this going from desharp of indifference to acceptance where it's so outward and at the same time we're dealing with the self. and the power of that existentialism. >> he kicked open the door-- along with alex katz and a couple of other people-- for an intelligent, forward-looking, modern portrait. most people who were working with imagery were trying to breathe new life into 19th century issues. and he came along and said "we're going to make this of an entirely different order." >> with someone of the statue of warhol, there's also a kind of oedipal path where even if you move away from him you will end up meeting him and sort of finding that you do live in his world. >> rose: also this evening, a rebroad cast of our conversation with damian hirst. >> i think without andy warhol i wouldn't have gone so gung-ho. but people say "oh, my god, you've got factory." and you think f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)